Tag Archives: children

“Tell Me, What’s Your Name?”, Rehovot, Israel 2008

Tell Me, What’s Your Name? is the title of the book these girls are reading. It may also have been the first thing they said to each other when they met in their nursery school class in the Israeli city of Rehovot. Rehovot, is one of the oldest and most diverse modern Israeli cities, was …

The Secret, Mevaseret Zion Absorption Center, Israel 1990

During the 1980s and 1990s, many Jews came to Israel from Ethiopia and the former Soviet Union for religious freedom and a better life. These immigrants often lived in special apartment buildings, called “absorption centers,” until they could find more permanent homes. Absorption centers provide temporary housing and an introduction to Israeli life for many …

Bedouin Kindergarten, Negev, Israel 2001

The Bedouin are a traditionally nomadic population that lives throughout the Middle East. There are about 200,000 Bedouin in southern Israel. While most live in Israeli-built towns, many do not and still practice a semi-nomadic lifestyle.  

Schoolchildren, Jerusalem, Israel 2007

Named for the town of Belz in western Ukraine and founded by Rabbi Shalom Rokeach in the early 19th century, the Belzer have become one of the largest ultra-Orthodox communities in Israel.

Absorption Center, Mevaseret Zion, Israel 2008

The newly arrived Ethiopian immigrants in this photograph are staying at an absorption centers outside of Jerusalem until they find more permanent homes. Absorption centers provide temporary housing and an introduction to Israeli life for many new immigrants. The photographer, Zion Ozeri, explains how important these centers are: “The first few steps of any immigrant …

Mother and Son, Ramla, Israel 1986

Jews have lived in Ethiopia for hundreds and hundreds of years. But in the 1970s and 1980s, life became very difficult for them. They were no longer safe. So, in 1984, the Israeli government organized a secret operation—known as Operation Moses—to bring Ethiopia’s Jews to Israel. In six short weeks, almost 8,000 Ethiopian Jews were …

Schoolgirl, Israel ,Circa 1989

Shortly after arriving from Ethiopia, this schoolgirl draws a picture in celebration of Hanukah. Israel is home to a diverse mixture of Jews with varying traditions, customs and national origins.  

A New Land, Hadera, Israel 1998

An immigrant mother from Russia, who just moved in to a home in, pointing the new landscape to her child.

Social Justice, Tzfat, Israel, 2008

Tzfat has the highest elevation of any city in Israel and is located north of the Sea of Galilee in a lushly forested and hilly area. Since the 16th century it has been considered one of four holy cities in Israel and has been the capital of the mystical practice of Kabbalah, for which it …

Tell Me, What’s Your Name, Rehovot, Israel, 2008

Tell Me, What’s Your Name is the title of the book these girls are reading. It may also have been the Œfirst thing they said to each other when they met in their nursery school class in the Israeli city of Rehovot. Rehovot (literally, “wide expanses”) is one of the oldest and most diverse modern Israeli cities. …

The Secret, M’vaseret Zion, Israel, 1990

During the 1980s and 1990s, many Jews came to Israel from Ethiopia and the former Soviet Union for religious freedom and a better life. These immigrants often lived in special apartment buildings, called “absorption centers,” until they could Œfind more permanent homes. Absorption centers provide temporary housing and an introduction to Israeli life for many new immigrants. The …

The Shape of Sound, Yemen, 1991

Whether you’re in a cave in Yemen or a yeshiva in Brooklyn, the letters of the Hebrew alphabet and the words of the Torah remain the same. It is these universal Jewish traditions that keep communities connected across time and space. Why do you think the photographer calls this picture The Shape of Sound?   Sample Texts: …

Kapparot, Kew Garden Hills, Queens, New York, 1995

In this picture, Kew Garden Hills, Queens, is the setting for kapparot, one of the more unusual Jewish folk customs. This boy’s mother holds a prayer book for him as he waves a chicken over his head. Through this act, which is practiced just before Yom Kippur, a person’s sins are symbolically transferred to the bird. The chicken …